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    Exclusive Art Interview!

    Happy Holidays, Boys and Girls! Today I bring you what may be our last little gift of the year from Runic, the long awaited Art Interview! That's right, those questions we collected from the community over a month ago have been answered by not just one artist, not two artists, but the ENTIRE Runic Games Art Team. Due to the sheer number of artists, each person has been color coded for your viewing ease.

    But that's not all! Not only did they take the time to answer all 20 questions in great depth, but we also have an exclusive piece of concept art for the Outlander and Railman classes, but two short videos showing off the way the idle animations change depending on the weapon(s) the character is holding. You can see both at their appropriate places in the interview.

    This is the forum version, which contains the entire interview in one huge chunk. To read the interview broken down into shorter pages, follow the following link to the News section version: Click Here!


    1. Who's new to the art team that has yet to introduce him/herself?

    TIM SWOPE, Environment Artist

    Hi. I 'm Tim Swope, the new environment artist here at Runic. I have been living here in Seattle since 2002 but I am originally from Connecticut. My education was in illustration and my previous experience in the industry has been mostly with hand held games. I have been a fan of Torchlight since it came out so I jumped when I saw a position open up at Runic last summer. So far it has been great. The art style is really well established and fun to work with. The studio puts a high priority on quality and creativity making it a great place to be an artist. There's a lot to do around here but nothing the team can't handle. I am proud to be part of this production and confident that TL2 is going please fans.


    COLIN TURNER, Animator

    My name is Colin Turner and I am an Animator here at Runic games. Back in high-school I wanted to animate with clay due to my sculptural background and interest in motion. Will Vinton Studios, however would not grant me an interview while Alvy Ray Smith, the co-founder of Pixar did! Thus began my lifelong passion for computer animation. Also due to my avid love of games combined with my propensity to fail miserably at playing them, applying my obsession with motion toward the advancement of my favorite hobby/pastime seems the perfect fit for me.

    As far as my role here at the office, when I am not making coffee for, and/or massaging the feet of my superiors, my main role here at Runic Games is character animation with some rigging sprinkled in when needed.


    MATT TINARI, Environment Lead

    Hello there! My name is Matthew Tinari and I am the Environment Art Lead here at Runic. I've been professionally making the arts for video games for almost 7 years now. I attended Savannah College of Art and Design and graduated in 2004 with a BFA focusing on Graphic Design ... lotta good that did me! Video game art has consumed me for the better part of a decade and I wouldn't have it any other way.

    I look forward to shipping Torchlight 2 and sharing with the world what we have been hard at work on here.


    2. What are the inspirations you have when deciding what the game is going to look like, and what type of equipment would you recommend using for digital as well as physical art projects

    JASON BECK, Art Director
    I think all of the artists have their own personal influences that they bring to the table. It's a good thing to have those tendencies as long as those influences are filtered through the goals for the project, because you end up with something that's visually cohesive, but varied enough to bring a richness to the world. There's a fine line between consistency (which we absolutely want)and 'hitting one note over and over' (which we don't).

    The great thing with a sequel is that you've got a visual foundation to work from. So, many of the inspirations didn't change from the original project, but you push things a little further, make some minor adjustments, refine what works, and fix or drop what didn't work to your liking.

    As far as equipment is concerned, don't get too caught up in the tools. My best advice is to try all kinds of media and something will jump out to you as feeling 'right'. Everyone's a bit different. But, whatever you choose, keep doing it and practice as much as you're able. Sketch when you want to...and force yourself to sketch when you don't really feel like it.


    3. I've noticed, in the gameplay videos that have been released so far, that Torchlight 2's environments, primarily the outdoor areas, have a paler, less saturated, kind of pastel-y color scheme to them when compared to the town (or any of the other locales) featured in Torchlight 1. (I think the outdoor areas I'm referring to are the grassy/rocky zones outside of the Estherian town.) Does this just happen to be the look for that part of the game, or is this an indication of a greater overall shift in the Torchlight art style?

    ADAM PERIN, TECHNICAL ART LEAD

    We like color! Torchlight 2, like Torchlight 1, will continue to be very colorful. Style wise the environments haven't changed dramatically. We aren't looking to make a deadly serious game and we believe that our environments convey this. This time around, we are just trying to step up the quality and get an even more painted feel to our environments.


    MATT TINARI

    The shift to a more illustrated, painterly style is something I have been working on since my arrival toward the beginning of the project. We haven't made and overall shift in the art style as much as we've built upon on what worked and have improved upon what wasn't working quite as well in the first Torchlight. I believe that when more content starts to be revealed and ultimately the game is released, you will see how much more alive and lush the world of Torchlight 2 is.


    JASON

    In Torchlight we had a fairly broad range in our environment textures, primarily because we were experimenting as we went and had little time to circle back to sync things back up. Some areas had a 'faux-watercolor' overlay and others felt more realistic. So, we're really trying to narrow that range and target our most successful areas that we hit towards the end of TL production.
    I wouldn't really describe it as desaturated or pale...that's not one of our goals. I think what you saw in the gameplay footage was a blend of weather effects and fog...which we're still dialing in.


    4. What changes have been done to the style, if any? Is it still Incredibles meets Dragon's Lair or did you add to it? The outdoor areas do kinda have a little paint brush look to it, or it could be the video quality.


    JASON

    It really is refinement rather than a shift. We definitely used that 'Incredibles meets Dragon's Lair' tag to help explain our desired target back when few people had played the demo builds and no one knew a thing about Torchlight, our team, or what the heck this new Runic Games developer was doing. Now that Torchlight has been out for over a year and we have enough eyes on it and the familiarity has increased we're hopeful that our look will start to stand on its own merits. But, that said...those two influences still excite me. They are both so full of awesome.

    5. Catacombs I assume is essentially the new Crypt tileset. While the structure of a crypt/catacomb can change, something like a mine or natural cavern can't change too much(mine/cave tileset from TL1), so it would be more atmospheric than structural from my perspective. Since Torchlight(town) is in Vilderan, I assume the geographical location can't change too much, so mines/caves should look similar. What did you go through in order to not "rehash" Torchlight 1 dungeon concepts/sets?

    ADAM

    Well we will be trying again to keep a good mix of natural dungeons and structural dungeons. And although surely caves in some nature will reappear, we are making a greater effort this time around to make our natural dungeons feel even more organic, meaning less harsh wall transitions and more curved flowing spaces. Also we plan on playing up larger changes between our natural dungeons, for example, having a natural dungeon that has lots of cliff falloffs and open cavernous rooms versus a natural dungeon that feel more claustrophobic with tight bottleneck points can make for pretty significant gameplay differences and overall feel.


    MIKE FRANCHINA, Concept Artist

    Catacombs was tasked as one of our "generic" dungeons. A type of dungeon that could go anywhere in the world. Since it was generic, there wasn't much in the way of story to go with this, it had to kind of generate its own story, so i decided to draw a Catacomb. Catacombs are pretty self explanatory, you just add skulls and skeletons, various semi-religious artifacts, and candles, lots and lots of candles. So that was the goal, make something that was a quintessential Catacomb and felt at home in a number of locales.


    6. I'm curious about the Zeraphi/Ezrohir where(mythology, folklore, religion, imagination, etc) did you draw inspiration from for their design?

    JAMUS THAYN, Character Artist

    The Zeraphi/Ez'Rohir are kind of a mash-up of cool ideas or visuals that we wanted to explore. Some of the influences were 'Kingdom of Heaven's' King Baldwin IV with the mask and wraps. We pulled in the whole mummy vibe and the golden masks and then banged out how they fit into the world, defining their relationship with the mystical wraps and these automatons they've built. If further developed into a race that was the first to toy with corrupted ember and alchemy and how they've mastered those arts.

    There's all sorts of other things I pull from when fleshing out the feel of something, I do draw heavily from mythology and distinct cultures to get that underlying current, then it's all about riffing on the idea and letting it go if you can. The core was defining their base look and the history of why they were what they are. I guess ultimately the answer is, you draw inspiration from everything.. always look for new things and to refine your 'cool-sense' then let it loose on your team and let it grow into what will hopefully be a truly bad-ass idea.


    MIKE FRANCHINA

    Well you guys have only seen the Ezrohir so far so I'll talk about them. Originally the Ezrohir were going to look like their Zeraphi brothers. They'd have similar mummy-esque wrappings and deathmasks. So I was sketching lots of little ideas, trying to come up with something cool. I wasn't having much luck, until I started thinking about making the masks like skulls. Then I started coming up with some cool ideas. In the end I crossed a skull, with a bali demon mask and there ya' go. I added some clockwork armor and that's how we got the Ezrohir.
    7. Is there going to be a throwback to light radius and what about torches?
    We tried really hard to decipher what the question was, but couldn't quite put together anything worth reading


    8. How easy would it be to work with said environmental effects (if they are present) within TorchED2? (like can we just set up a clock with weather transitions for the whole game or will we have to establish each map's cycle?)

    ADAM
    Right now each of our dungeons and outdoor areas each have their own rules for their environmental effects. We do this so that we can easily alter the lighting and weather to better convey the atmosphere in that region.


    9. How many equipment sets will there be in Torchlight 2? How many suits total?
    Will it be a global pool of equipment or will you have sets distributed between the class restriction?


    KYLE CORNELIUS, Concept Artist

    In Torchlight 2 we've kept a lot of the themed sets (either creature or environment based) in the general pool of multi-class gear. We really wanted to establish a strong direction for each class that made them unique, and bring this across aesthetically in the class specific sets that you acquire as you progress through the story.


    JEFF MIANOWSKI, Character Lead

    Not including the armor the player starts with, (which is also class specific) we will have 16 sets that are class specific armor (4 per class) throughout the game. Beyond that we will have around 60 other sets that may be worn by anyone. These visual styles rang from robes to heavy plate and may be more appropriate for certain classes depending on the stats, however any class is free to wear them.


    10. What limitations did you set on character customization as far as how I would like my character/pet to look?

    JEFF
    Right now we're looking to have 3 basic choices for the character customization; hair (style and color), face type (nose/eyes/beard), and skin tone.
    As for pets, we'll be including more choices (species-wise) as well with different textures/colors for each type.


    11. What about post character generation alterations? Like can I get a tattoo or change my character's hair color?

    JEFF
    We haven't discussed that really, however it might be possible.


    JASON
    In my mind, this is something we need to tackle in the MMO. MMO's have a bit more emphasis on customization and making the avatar "your own". While we certainly want to present options to the players, it really comes down to time and necessity. This is one of those wishlist type items for TL2, that will likely get punted to the MMO.


    12. The question I would most like to ask is a two parter ...What differences have the artists who have worked on both Torchlight and now Torchlight II noticed between the two games, as far as techniques used, and (this can be aimed at all the artists) do they feel working in the games industry has changed their perspectives as far as their own work is concerned, has it gotten better or has it made them approach it differently, and exactly how has it gotten better, what new approaches, if any, have they learned?

    JAMUS

    Wow.. Big question. So first off I think in regards to techniques from TL1 to TL2 not a whole lot has changed. We still hand paint our textures in a 'cartoon-y' vibe and are pretty low poly in the modeling scheme of things. The style has of course grown and refined itself which is what you're always hoping for on the art side of development. There have been some wonderful improvements, and there have been some things that have been tough but necessary to adjust due to time and technical limitations. Where we have to pull back in one area, let's say body shapes to make the wardrobe system more functional.. then we make a huge effort to bring something new to balance the scale, let's say close to 3 times the amount of armor in TL1... shhhhh I don't think I'm supposed to say that.

    Before I started in the industry several years ago I went to school for a Game Art and Design degree and there a saying in my classes by some of our teachers, that you would learn more in your first 3 months in the industry than 3 years of going to school. This is without a doubt true for everyone I've talked to since breaking into the biz. You have to hope working in the industry has made you get better, most artist are their own worst critics and so it's kind of hard to judge personally. But I've been blessed to work with some incredibly talented people, and when your hobby becomes your job it puts a whole new level of intensity and scrutiny on that process. You realize that the good enough bar you may have gauged in your free time is raised to a whole new level. You want to do more and be better for yourself and the team around you. You will constantly be learning new techniques and tips from your co-workers, and contrary to the glam view of our lifestyle.. it really is a lot of hard work and self-management. I wouldn't trade it for the world though.


    MIKE FISHER, UI/2D Artist

    The main difference in art for UI from Torchlight to Torchlight2 can pretty much be summed up in one word:? Refinement. Particularly in giving a more polished and streamlined look to these elements. Addressing the needs for menus that simply and more precisely conveyed much more information, meant I had to trade a much less "chunky" style in the layout art for something less bold. The enjoyable challenge was in still retaining the original concepts and flavor of the original art, but in forms that were smaller, perhaps simpler and more concise. This time around I also enjoyed playing with a bit more dynamic palette, as well as more use of varied textures and layering of elements. Still, my favorite Is generating the "postage-stamp" art for the icons ...especially for skills.

    As for how this industry has changed my perspective about my own personal work, I'd say it has greatly benefited. Just plain practice will always enhance one's skill, so simply by volume of production alone you are bound to refine your craft. Also an environment where you are always rubbing shoulders with a group of very talented folks, and the constant give and take of opinions and ideas is the best thing in the world for massaging the creative muscles. The use of the digital tools (I render in 2D for UI assets, so I work pretty much exclusively with Photoshop and a Wacom tablet), has given me new ideas for techniques and such for my art outside of work. For my personal stuff I like to paint in acrylics, and while it is much different from the things I do on the job, the use of Photoshop has enhanced my sense of layering transparent color for example?


    MATT LEFFERTS, Animation Lead

    Well we have definitely refined the animation style from Torchlight 1, this time around we have a lot more detail going into them. We are using special bones for animating coat tails and other dangles, eyes that can look around and blink, mouths that open, and individual fingers for more elaborate hand poses. Beyond the deeper complexity of the rig itself, in TL1 the player characters had somewhere in the nature of 45-50 animations each. In TL2 the player characters each have upwards of 145-150, and that's only as it stands now. Largely this increase in animation count comes from some excellent improvements we've made to the animation system itself, most notably; The Animation Selection System which we implemented to allow for different idle poses, attacks and run animations based on the currently equipped weapon type.










    KYLE

    For myself, it's generally the same as TL1. It consists of a bunch of little thumbnail scribbles, and then hopping into Photoshop for some further scribbling and ideation before doing a tighter line drawing and painting that in. As for the industry part, yes, it has completely changed how I go about my work. I majored in Industrial Design in college, and prior to working in the games industry, didn't draw all that much. I had never painted, knew nothing about color theory, and was generally ill-equipped artistically. The whole experience has been very humbling, as I stumble through different techniques and watch myself get better. Ultimately, it comes down to not being afraid to suck and step out of your comfort zone. While you might not be happy with the work you produce at first, you learn a lot and improve by leaps and bounds.


    13. I would ask them about art (textures) for uniques, in TL1 even low level weapons were pretty fancy (art wise) and uniques weren't that different, can we except more unique look for uniques? (though, it was the case only with swords, I guess.. guns were pretty unique)

    KYLE

    I am not sure if the breakdown has been entirely decided yet, but I would love to have unique art for some of the unique weapons. It's always a bit underwhelming when the unique sword that just dropped has the same model and texture as the last several normal swords you picked up. Having those uniques feel incredibly cool when you equip them is important this time around. As is the case with the armor sets, there will be a lot of weapons/items that help contribute to the feel of your particular character class. Without giving too much away, there will be options for various classes... for example the Railman, that are more mechanically oriented, have weaponry that feel suited specifically to the class design.



    JEFF
    Yes, we would like to have a larger range of weapon "looks", not only detail-wise but also in terms of weapon style. Weapons that look like they came from different regions and cultures of the world of Torchlight.


    14. I would like to know if they saw SorrySoldOut's mod and what they think about it...

    MATT LEFFERTS

    Ahhh yeah!? I remember when that one came out. There were some definitely cool things going on there. As I recall there were some very positive reactions in the community to SSO's mod. It had a much much grittier style to the world that many people were a fan of. I remember when we were in early pre-production of TL1 we made the choice to keep things with a particular level of cartooniness and stylization, rather than go with darker grittier look that was popular throughout the industry. So if that was something people were looking for, it was cool that a modder stepped up and could supply the alternative for those looking to embellish.


    COLIN

    I think this mod is awesome! It adds a certain amount of grit that I really enjoy. of course I wasn't one of the people slaving over the original textures. If someone were to do a mod with all new animations I don't know if I would be nearly as impressed. Unless they were awesome. In which case I would be force to duel them to the death. Also in this scenario I have a Thompson M1 and they have a butter knife. Also they start 100 feet away in an open field. Did you know that the A1 in Thompson A1 stands for Annihilator 1? What were we talking about?


    15. Are the old weapon enchantment particle effects going to be the same or are they getting a new look? Are we getting any new enchantment particle effects corresponding to new enchantment types besides just fire, cold, poison and electricity? Any particle effects getting added to armor or other items besides just weapons?

    JASON

    Our particles are getting a bit of an overhaul both in their look and usage. The big design hurdle for us is dialing down our effects with Multiplayer in mind so that it's not an overwhelming mess of flashes and particles. I think many noticed that our effects were sort of dialed to eleven in Torchlight. You want to maintain the feeling of firing off an impressive skill, but we have to balance things for more players on screen. It can turn into a strobe light mess real quickly, so we're paying extra attention on finding the happy spot. Visually, we're trying to do more stylized effects that better match our style and feel a bit more refined overall. As far as enchantment particles changing or being added to other items goes...it's still being balanced out, but I think it's unlikely that we'll add more particles to more objects given the hurdles we face merely from adding more players (and more monsters, and more pets, and more ambient effects, etc.)


    16. What software/hardware does the art team use for drawing the art? Such as what drawing pads, and photoshop, etc?

    MATT TINARI
    We use 3Ds Max for modeling and animating all of our environment and character art. We paint our textures in Photoshop with Wacom Intuos 4 tablets. We use our own editor, TorchEd (which you can get a copy of and tool around with on our website), to integrate all of the models and animations we make into the game itself.


    KYLE
    Pencils, paper, Wacom Cintiq, Photoshop.


    MIKE FRANCHINA
    I use Photoshop CS4 and a 21x Cintiq. I also sketch a lot with pencil and paper.


    17. You now have a writer, many coders, quest designers and a fairly large art team, so where do the ideas come from for new content? Do the writer or quest designers say "I need this" and you make it for them, or does the art team come up with something first and everyone else has to work with it?

    JASON

    It's a bit of both, and it's not just from designers or artists either. We really want every member of our team to have input, so if an idea is cool and it fits...we try to find a home for it. Generally we do 'spitballing' sessions when we can and follow up with a 'sanity check' from Coding, Level Design, Writing, and Art to make sure we're all on board with something and it fits our goals. That said, the art team is afforded a great deal of autonomy in filling in the gaps where a creature really doesn't impact a main quest line or things that really require much deliberation. I think the reason for this is so many of us across the entire Runic team approach things from a game design sense, so a really cool visual usually also has an interesting lore element or game play mechanic associated with the pitch from the get go.

    18. What does working on a sequel with experience + larger budget allow for the art-team to utilize this time around that may not have necessarily been able to with the first game?

    JASON

    Well, I would phrase it as 'having a budget that no longer makes you worried about the ability to finish the game before we're on the streets' versus having a 'big budget' Our budget and studio philosophy is basically the same as it was on TL. We know what our team is capable of in a certain timeframe and with various constraints to work within. If anything, we're less rushed. We still have an urgency in everything...our pace is pretty crazy...but we have the ability now to go back and polish things a bit more than before. With Torchlight, there were enough cases where good enough had to be it...there simply wasn't time or bandwidth to go back and fix anything but the most glaring offenders. With Torchlight 2, there's still going to be things we'd like to polish up, but now we might actually be able to get to most of them.

    19. What's the process for modeling/animating a new character and testing this within the game?

    COLIN

    I start by getting Andy Serkis on the phone and end by pasting one thousand ping pong balls to his sleek skin tight onesy. Just kidding. Really though,? by the time I get my hands on the model, it and the texture are pretty much done. I then go about creating a set of bones that fit within the mesh of the model, utilizing character studio, taking special care to look at the pivot points and how they would relate to the anatomy of a real creature. The goal being all the pieces moving together believably. You can have the perfect model but if you position the bones incorrectly then no amount of massaging the animation will make it move properly.


    JAMUS
    Well the basic process is pretty straight forward. Once we have an approved concept we model out said creature in max or whatever digital program you use, then lay out the UVs. Once those are solid we begin painting the model-- I use a combination of body paint and photoshop, this is typically the longest part of the process, but also thankfully the most fun. Then we have to do all the technical stuff like rigging, separating texture layers for different equipment slots, assigning material IDs to the model so it knows how to stitch together the armors. We then need to figure out how to cull IDs for overlapping pieces of armor, deciding the names of the items and entering them into the engine, setting up stats, drop rates, and all that jazz. After they're exported and have the animations to support them we'll spawn them in game and check them out for bugs.


    MATT LEFFERTS

    When we animate a new character we always start with the most important animation first. The Idle. 90% of the rest of the animation set is going to branch from this animation, and it's a deceptively complex animation to capture right. It's the animation that is going to be the most indicative of the character's personality right off the bat. As an animator, this is when you get inside the head of the character. How intelligent is it?? What are its cultural influences?? What's it like alone in a room with a baby?? It has to sell and suggest so much to the player, without being distracting or overbearing. The most common approach for this type of game is to make the character sway back and forth or look as though it's breathing. Once we have something we like, we move onto the attacks and movement animations (I.E. Runs and Walks), then the deaths and what we call the "Hits". "Hits" are the animations of the character reacting to being attacked. With those done, we have the most basic set we need to export a character and test it out in the game. Here at Runic, the process of exporting the animations and setting up the character in game actually stays with me in the animation department. Everything is done with our inhouse tool TorchEd, setting up the sound effects attached to a given animation, the triggers for when damage is applied, and certain particle effects. It's also in TorchEd that we create a unit file to turn the character into an actual monster. At this point we're not too worried about the specific stats of the new character but more about its general feel and behavior.


    JEFF
    Once we've received a new concept from the concept artists we'll start in on modeling the character, not worrying TOO much about poly count until we've gotten a good representation of the character in 3D. Once we're happy with model, it's time to unwrap the skin of the model onto a flat plane so that we can start painting the texture in photoshop. The average texture size for our monsters is 256x256. During the process of texturing there will usually be some model tweaks made as we see the final character coming together. Once the texture is complete, we may review the model again for any areas where we can cut down the polygon count without affecting the look of the character.

    Once we're through creating the model and texture we pass it on to the animators who create a skeleton for the model to be attached to. This skeleton is what the animators manipulate to create and record the animations used in the game. The animators along with the engineers then take creatures and set them up in the game with skills, behaviors and abilities.


    Players/Armor Sets
    While we generally use the same process as monsters, because the players can mix and match different pieces of armor (and hair/faces at character creation) the process for creating player characters is a bit more complicated/technical. Every armor set has 6 visual pieces that can be taken off (helm, shoulders, chest, pants, gloves and boots) and all of these pieces for EVERY set of armor need to fit with each other. Because of this, there are particular "seams" on the arms, legs, waist and neck of the character that all of the armor designs must fit into. Sometimes when we receive a concept the design for the new armor poses some problems because it doesn't quite fit these restrictions, so we generally have more back and forth design discussions with the concept artists about armor.

    On top of that, every armor set needs TWO models, one male and one female. Some armor sets might even include 2 slightly different designs for the chest piece between male and females as well.

    Because of all these reasons, player armor can be A LOT of work, heheh. Once the armor sets are attached to the player skeletons, they can be put into the game and testing can begin; swapping all the parts from all of the sets with each other to make sure everything is working properly.


    20. (A request) Can we get a video of artist drawing texture for some model from scratch.. doesn't have to be even moderated, just sped up video of your work.

    JASON

    For this piece, no. We just didn't have the time to put this together, but we'll try to do something similar for a future 'modders' guide.

    BUT, we didn't want to leave you guys without something new to look at. Lefferts rendered out a couple animations to highlight the changes to the Animation Selection System and we've got a concept piece showing off some Outlander and Railmen gear. Sorry, no new class announcement....yet. Yet.


    That's all! A HUGE thank you to the Art Team, especially Jason for putting this all together, as well as everyone in the community who contributed questions. To everyone else out there, reading this, Happy Holidays! The Runic dev team will be closing for the holidays in about a week from now, and in January they'll be back with some huge developments! Of course I'll be around the site doing some work on it while I have the time, so don't be afraid to come around and say hi!

    Files:
    Image: Exclusive Art Interview!-gear_outlander_railman-jpg
    Animation 1 Raw: http://files.runicgamesfansite.com/hum_f_idle_fist_dw.MOV
    Animation 2 Raw: http://files.runicgamesfansite.com/hum_f_idle_pistol_dw.mov

    *********

    Happy Holidays, Boys and Girls! Today I bring you what may be our last little gift of the year from Runic, the long awaited Art Interview! That's right, those questions we collected from the community over a month ago have been answered by not just one artist, not two artists, but the ENTIRE Runic Games Art Team. Due to the sheer number of artists, each person has been color coded for your viewing ease.

    But that's not all! Not only did they take the time to answer all 20 questions in great depth, but we also have an exclusive piece of concept art for the Outlander and Railman classes, but two short videos showing off the way the idle animations change depending on the weapon(s) the character is holding. You can see both at their appropriate places in the interview.

    This is the News Page version, which contains the entire interview split into several pages. To read the interview in one huge chunk, follow the following link to the forum version: Click Here!


    (Note: The Page Menu is on the top right of the page!)

    Part 1


    1. Who's new to the art team that has yet to introduce him/herself?

    TIM SWOPE, Environment Artist

    Hi. I 'm Tim Swope, the new environment artist here at Runic. I have been living here in Seattle since 2002 but I am originally from Connecticut. My education was in illustration and my previous experience in the industry has been mostly with hand held games. I have been a fan of Torchlight since it came out so I jumped when I saw a position open up at Runic last summer. So far it has been great. The art style is really well established and fun to work with. The studio puts a high priority on quality and creativity making it a great place to be an artist. There's a lot to do around here but nothing the team can't handle. I am proud to be part of this production and confident that TL2 is going please fans.


    COLIN TURNER, Animator

    My name is Colin Turner and I am an Animator here at Runic games. Back in high-school I wanted to animate with clay due to my sculptural background and interest in motion. Will Vinton Studios, however would not grant me an interview while Alvy Ray Smith, the co-founder of Pixar did! Thus began my lifelong passion for computer animation. Also due to my avid love of games combined with my propensity to fail miserably at playing them, applying my obsession with motion toward the advancement of my favorite hobby/pastime seems the perfect fit for me.

    As far as my role here at the office, when I am not making coffee for, and/or massaging the feet of my superiors, my main role here at Runic Games is character animation with some rigging sprinkled in when needed.


    MATT TINARI, Environment Lead

    Hello there! My name is Matthew Tinari and I am the Environment Art Lead here at Runic. I've been professionally making the arts for video games for almost 7 years now. I attended Savannah College of Art and Design and graduated in 2004 with a BFA focusing on Graphic Design ... lotta good that did me! Video game art has consumed me for the better part of a decade and I wouldn't have it any other way.

    I look forward to shipping Torchlight 2 and sharing with the world what we have been hard at work on here.


    2. What are the inspirations you have when deciding what the game is going to look like, and what type of equipment would you recommend using for digital as well as physical art projects

    JASON BECK, Art Director
    I think all of the artists have their own personal influences that they bring to the table. It's a good thing to have those tendencies as long as those influences are filtered through the goals for the project, because you end up with something that's visually cohesive, but varied enough to bring a richness to the world. There's a fine line between consistency (which we absolutely want)and 'hitting one note over and over' (which we don't).

    The great thing with a sequel is that you've got a visual foundation to work from. So, many of the inspirations didn't change from the original project, but you push things a little further, make some minor adjustments, refine what works, and fix or drop what didn't work to your liking.

    As far as equipment is concerned, don't get too caught up in the tools. My best advice is to try all kinds of media and something will jump out to you as feeling 'right'. Everyone's a bit different. But, whatever you choose, keep doing it and practice as much as you're able. Sketch when you want to...and force yourself to sketch when you don't really feel like it.


    3. I've noticed, in the gameplay videos that have been released so far, that Torchlight 2's environments, primarily the outdoor areas, have a paler, less saturated, kind of pastel-y color scheme to them when compared to the town (or any of the other locales) featured in Torchlight 1. (I think the outdoor areas I'm referring to are the grassy/rocky zones outside of the Estherian town.) Does this just happen to be the look for that part of the game, or is this an indication of a greater overall shift in the Torchlight art style?

    ADAM PERIN, TECHNICAL ART LEAD

    We like color! Torchlight 2, like Torchlight 1, will continue to be very colorful. Style wise the environments haven't changed dramatically. We aren't looking to make a deadly serious game and we believe that our environments convey this. This time around, we are just trying to step up the quality and get an even more painted feel to our environments.


    MATT TINARI

    The shift to a more illustrated, painterly style is something I have been working on since my arrival toward the beginning of the project. We haven't made and overall shift in the art style as much as we've built upon on what worked and have improved upon what wasn't working quite as well in the first Torchlight. I believe that when more content starts to be revealed and ultimately the game is released, you will see how much more alive and lush the world of Torchlight 2 is.


    JASON

    In Torchlight we had a fairly broad range in our environment textures, primarily because we were experimenting as we went and had little time to circle back to sync things back up. Some areas had a 'faux-watercolor' overlay and others felt more realistic. So, we're really trying to narrow that range and target our most successful areas that we hit towards the end of TL production.
    I wouldn't really describe it as desaturated or pale...that's not one of our goals. I think what you saw in the gameplay footage was a blend of weather effects and fog...which we're still dialing in.


    4. What changes have been done to the style, if any? Is it still Incredibles meets Dragon's Lair or did you add to it? The outdoor areas do kinda have a little paint brush look to it, or it could be the video quality.


    JASON

    It really is refinement rather than a shift. We definitely used that 'Incredibles meets Dragon's Lair' tag to help explain our desired target back when few people had played the demo builds and no one knew a thing about Torchlight, our team, or what the heck this new Runic Games developer was doing. Now that Torchlight has been out for over a year and we have enough eyes on it and the familiarity has increased we're hopeful that our look will start to stand on its own merits. But, that said...those two influences still excite me. They are both so full of awesome.

    Part 2

    5. Catacombs I assume is essentially the new Crypt tileset. While the structure of a crypt/catacomb can change, something like a mine or natural cavern can't change too much(mine/cave tileset from TL1), so it would be more atmospheric than structural from my perspective. Since Torchlight(town) is in Vilderan, I assume the geographical location can't change too much, so mines/caves should look similar. What did you go through in order to not "rehash" Torchlight 1 dungeon concepts/sets?

    ADAM

    Well we will be trying again to keep a good mix of natural dungeons and structural dungeons. And although surely caves in some nature will reappear, we are making a greater effort this time around to make our natural dungeons feel even more organic, meaning less harsh wall transitions and more curved flowing spaces. Also we plan on playing up larger changes between our natural dungeons, for example, having a natural dungeon that has lots of cliff falloffs and open cavernous rooms versus a natural dungeon that feel more claustrophobic with tight bottleneck points can make for pretty significant gameplay differences and overall feel.


    MIKE FRANCHINA, Concept Artist

    Catacombs was tasked as one of our "generic" dungeons. A type of dungeon that could go anywhere in the world. Since it was generic, there wasn't much in the way of story to go with this, it had to kind of generate its own story, so i decided to draw a Catacomb. Catacombs are pretty self explanatory, you just add skulls and skeletons, various semi-religious artifacts, and candles, lots and lots of candles. So that was the goal, make something that was a quintessential Catacomb and felt at home in a number of locales.


    6. I'm curious about the Zeraphi/Ezrohir where(mythology, folklore, religion, imagination, etc) did you draw inspiration from for their design?

    JAMUS THAYN, Character Artist

    The Zeraphi/Ez'Rohir are kind of a mash-up of cool ideas or visuals that we wanted to explore. Some of the influences were 'Kingdom of Heaven's' King Baldwin IV with the mask and wraps. We pulled in the whole mummy vibe and the golden masks and then banged out how they fit into the world, defining their relationship with the mystical wraps and these automatons they've built. If further developed into a race that was the first to toy with corrupted ember and alchemy and how they've mastered those arts.

    There's all sorts of other things I pull from when fleshing out the feel of something, I do draw heavily from mythology and distinct cultures to get that underlying current, then it's all about riffing on the idea and letting it go if you can. The core was defining their base look and the history of why they were what they are. I guess ultimately the answer is, you draw inspiration from everything.. always look for new things and to refine your 'cool-sense' then let it loose on your team and let it grow into what will hopefully be a truly bad-ass idea.


    MIKE FRANCHINA

    Well you guys have only seen the Ezrohir so far so I'll talk about them. Originally the Ezrohir were going to look like their Zeraphi brothers. They'd have similar mummy-esque wrappings and deathmasks. So I was sketching lots of little ideas, trying to come up with something cool. I wasn't having much luck, until I started thinking about making the masks like skulls. Then I started coming up with some cool ideas. In the end I crossed a skull, with a bali demon mask and there ya' go. I added some clockwork armor and that's how we got the Ezrohir.
    7. Is there going to be a throwback to light radius and what about torches?
    We tried really hard to decipher what the question was, but couldn't quite put together anything worth reading


    8. How easy would it be to work with said environmental effects (if they are present) within TorchED2? (like can we just set up a clock with weather transitions for the whole game or will we have to establish each map's cycle?)

    ADAM
    Right now each of our dungeons and outdoor areas each have their own rules for their environmental effects. We do this so that we can easily alter the lighting and weather to better convey the atmosphere in that region.

    Part 3

    9. How many equipment sets will there be in Torchlight 2? How many suits total?
    Will it be a global pool of equipment or will you have sets distributed between the class restriction?


    KYLE CORNELIUS, Concept Artist

    In Torchlight 2 we've kept a lot of the themed sets (either creature or environment based) in the general pool of multi-class gear. We really wanted to establish a strong direction for each class that made them unique, and bring this across aesthetically in the class specific sets that you acquire as you progress through the story.


    JEFF MIANOWSKI, Character Lead

    Not including the armor the player starts with, (which is also class specific) we will have 16 sets that are class specific armor (4 per class) throughout the game. Beyond that we will have around 60 other sets that may be worn by anyone. These visual styles rang from robes to heavy plate and may be more appropriate for certain classes depending on the stats, however any class is free to wear them.


    10. What limitations did you set on character customization as far as how I would like my character/pet to look?

    JEFF
    Right now we're looking to have 3 basic choices for the character customization; hair (style and color), face type (nose/eyes/beard), and skin tone.
    As for pets, we'll be including more choices (species-wise) as well with different textures/colors for each type.


    11. What about post character generation alterations? Like can I get a tattoo or change my character's hair color?

    JEFF
    We haven't discussed that really, however it might be possible.


    JASON
    In my mind, this is something we need to tackle in the MMO. MMO's have a bit more emphasis on customization and making the avatar "your own". While we certainly want to present options to the players, it really comes down to time and necessity. This is one of those wishlist type items for TL2, that will likely get punted to the MMO.


    12. The question I would most like to ask is a two parter ...What differences have the artists who have worked on both Torchlight and now Torchlight II noticed between the two games, as far as techniques used, and (this can be aimed at all the artists) do they feel working in the games industry has changed their perspectives as far as their own work is concerned, has it gotten better or has it made them approach it differently, and exactly how has it gotten better, what new approaches, if any, have they learned?

    JAMUS

    Wow.. Big question. So first off I think in regards to techniques from TL1 to TL2 not a whole lot has changed. We still hand paint our textures in a 'cartoon-y' vibe and are pretty low poly in the modeling scheme of things. The style has of course grown and refined itself which is what you're always hoping for on the art side of development. There have been some wonderful improvements, and there have been some things that have been tough but necessary to adjust due to time and technical limitations. Where we have to pull back in one area, let's say body shapes to make the wardrobe system more functional.. then we make a huge effort to bring something new to balance the scale, let's say close to 3 times the amount of armor in TL1... shhhhh I don't think I'm supposed to say that.

    Before I started in the industry several years ago I went to school for a Game Art and Design degree and there a saying in my classes by some of our teachers, that you would learn more in your first 3 months in the industry than 3 years of going to school. This is without a doubt true for everyone I've talked to since breaking into the biz. You have to hope working in the industry has made you get better, most artist are their own worst critics and so it's kind of hard to judge personally. But I've been blessed to work with some incredibly talented people, and when your hobby becomes your job it puts a whole new level of intensity and scrutiny on that process. You realize that the good enough bar you may have gauged in your free time is raised to a whole new level. You want to do more and be better for yourself and the team around you. You will constantly be learning new techniques and tips from your co-workers, and contrary to the glam view of our lifestyle.. it really is a lot of hard work and self-management. I wouldn't trade it for the world though.


    MIKE FISHER, UI/2D Artist

    The main difference in art for UI from Torchlight to Torchlight2 can pretty much be summed up in one word:? Refinement. Particularly in giving a more polished and streamlined look to these elements. Addressing the needs for menus that simply and more precisely conveyed much more information, meant I had to trade a much less "chunky" style in the layout art for something less bold. The enjoyable challenge was in still retaining the original concepts and flavor of the original art, but in forms that were smaller, perhaps simpler and more concise. This time around I also enjoyed playing with a bit more dynamic palette, as well as more use of varied textures and layering of elements. Still, my favorite Is generating the "postage-stamp" art for the icons ...especially for skills.

    As for how this industry has changed my perspective about my own personal work, I'd say it has greatly benefited. Just plain practice will always enhance one's skill, so simply by volume of production alone you are bound to refine your craft. Also an environment where you are always rubbing shoulders with a group of very talented folks, and the constant give and take of opinions and ideas is the best thing in the world for massaging the creative muscles. The use of the digital tools (I render in 2D for UI assets, so I work pretty much exclusively with Photoshop and a Wacom tablet), has given me new ideas for techniques and such for my art outside of work. For my personal stuff I like to paint in acrylics, and while it is much different from the things I do on the job, the use of Photoshop has enhanced my sense of layering transparent color for example?


    MATT LEFFERTS, Animation Lead

    Well we have definitely refined the animation style from Torchlight 1, this time around we have a lot more detail going into them. We are using special bones for animating coat tails and other dangles, eyes that can look around and blink, mouths that open, and individual fingers for more elaborate hand poses. Beyond the deeper complexity of the rig itself, in TL1 the player characters had somewhere in the nature of 45-50 animations each. In TL2 the player characters each have upwards of 145-150, and that's only as it stands now. Largely this increase in animation count comes from some excellent improvements we've made to the animation system itself, most notably; The Animation Selection System which we implemented to allow for different idle poses, attacks and run animations based on the currently equipped weapon type.










    KYLE

    For myself, it's generally the same as TL1. It consists of a bunch of little thumbnail scribbles, and then hopping into Photoshop for some further scribbling and ideation before doing a tighter line drawing and painting that in. As for the industry part, yes, it has completely changed how I go about my work. I majored in Industrial Design in college, and prior to working in the games industry, didn't draw all that much. I had never painted, knew nothing about color theory, and was generally ill-equipped artistically. The whole experience has been very humbling, as I stumble through different techniques and watch myself get better. Ultimately, it comes down to not being afraid to suck and step out of your comfort zone. While you might not be happy with the work you produce at first, you learn a lot and improve by leaps and bounds.

    Page 4

    13. I would ask them about art (textures) for uniques, in TL1 even low level weapons were pretty fancy (art wise) and uniques weren't that different, can we except more unique look for uniques? (though, it was the case only with swords, I guess.. guns were pretty unique)

    KYLE

    I am not sure if the breakdown has been entirely decided yet, but I would love to have unique art for some of the unique weapons. It's always a bit underwhelming when the unique sword that just dropped has the same model and texture as the last several normal swords you picked up. Having those uniques feel incredibly cool when you equip them is important this time around. As is the case with the armor sets, there will be a lot of weapons/items that help contribute to the feel of your particular character class. Without giving too much away, there will be options for various classes... for example the Railman, that are more mechanically oriented, have weaponry that feel suited specifically to the class design.



    JEFF
    Yes, we would like to have a larger range of weapon "looks", not only detail-wise but also in terms of weapon style. Weapons that look like they came from different regions and cultures of the world of Torchlight.


    14. I would like to know if they saw SorrySoldOut's mod and what they think about it...

    MATT LEFFERTS

    Ahhh yeah!? I remember when that one came out. There were some definitely cool things going on there. As I recall there were some very positive reactions in the community to SSO's mod. It had a much much grittier style to the world that many people were a fan of. I remember when we were in early pre-production of TL1 we made the choice to keep things with a particular level of cartooniness and stylization, rather than go with darker grittier look that was popular throughout the industry. So if that was something people were looking for, it was cool that a modder stepped up and could supply the alternative for those looking to embellish.


    COLIN

    I think this mod is awesome! It adds a certain amount of grit that I really enjoy. of course I wasn't one of the people slaving over the original textures. If someone were to do a mod with all new animations I don't know if I would be nearly as impressed. Unless they were awesome. In which case I would be force to duel them to the death. Also in this scenario I have a Thompson M1 and they have a butter knife. Also they start 100 feet away in an open field. Did you know that the A1 in Thompson A1 stands for Annihilator 1? What were we talking about?


    15. Are the old weapon enchantment particle effects going to be the same or are they getting a new look? Are we getting any new enchantment particle effects corresponding to new enchantment types besides just fire, cold, poison and electricity? Any particle effects getting added to armor or other items besides just weapons?

    JASON

    Our particles are getting a bit of an overhaul both in their look and usage. The big design hurdle for us is dialing down our effects with Multiplayer in mind so that it's not an overwhelming mess of flashes and particles. I think many noticed that our effects were sort of dialed to eleven in Torchlight. You want to maintain the feeling of firing off an impressive skill, but we have to balance things for more players on screen. It can turn into a strobe light mess real quickly, so we're paying extra attention on finding the happy spot. Visually, we're trying to do more stylized effects that better match our style and feel a bit more refined overall. As far as enchantment particles changing or being added to other items goes...it's still being balanced out, but I think it's unlikely that we'll add more particles to more objects given the hurdles we face merely from adding more players (and more monsters, and more pets, and more ambient effects, etc.)

    Part 5

    16. What software/hardware does the art team use for drawing the art? Such as what drawing pads, and photoshop, etc?

    MATT TINARI
    We use 3Ds Max for modeling and animating all of our environment and character art. We paint our textures in Photoshop with Wacom Intuos 4 tablets. We use our own editor, TorchEd (which you can get a copy of and tool around with on our website), to integrate all of the models and animations we make into the game itself.


    KYLE
    Pencils, paper, Wacom Cintiq, Photoshop.


    MIKE FRANCHINA
    I use Photoshop CS4 and a 21x Cintiq. I also sketch a lot with pencil and paper.


    17. You now have a writer, many coders, quest designers and a fairly large art team, so where do the ideas come from for new content? Do the writer or quest designers say "I need this" and you make it for them, or does the art team come up with something first and everyone else has to work with it?

    JASON

    It's a bit of both, and it's not just from designers or artists either. We really want every member of our team to have input, so if an idea is cool and it fits...we try to find a home for it. Generally we do 'spitballing' sessions when we can and follow up with a 'sanity check' from Coding, Level Design, Writing, and Art to make sure we're all on board with something and it fits our goals. That said, the art team is afforded a great deal of autonomy in filling in the gaps where a creature really doesn't impact a main quest line or things that really require much deliberation. I think the reason for this is so many of us across the entire Runic team approach things from a game design sense, so a really cool visual usually also has an interesting lore element or game play mechanic associated with the pitch from the get go.

    18. What does working on a sequel with experience + larger budget allow for the art-team to utilize this time around that may not have necessarily been able to with the first game?

    JASON

    Well, I would phrase it as 'having a budget that no longer makes you worried about the ability to finish the game before we're on the streets' versus having a 'big budget' Our budget and studio philosophy is basically the same as it was on TL. We know what our team is capable of in a certain timeframe and with various constraints to work within. If anything, we're less rushed. We still have an urgency in everything...our pace is pretty crazy...but we have the ability now to go back and polish things a bit more than before. With Torchlight, there were enough cases where good enough had to be it...there simply wasn't time or bandwidth to go back and fix anything but the most glaring offenders. With Torchlight 2, there's still going to be things we'd like to polish up, but now we might actually be able to get to most of them.

    19. What's the process for modeling/animating a new character and testing this within the game?

    COLIN

    I start by getting Andy Serkis on the phone and end by pasting one thousand ping pong balls to his sleek skin tight onesy. Just kidding. Really though,? by the time I get my hands on the model, it and the texture are pretty much done. I then go about creating a set of bones that fit within the mesh of the model, utilizing character studio, taking special care to look at the pivot points and how they would relate to the anatomy of a real creature. The goal being all the pieces moving together believably. You can have the perfect model but if you position the bones incorrectly then no amount of massaging the animation will make it move properly.


    JAMUS
    Well the basic process is pretty straight forward. Once we have an approved concept we model out said creature in max or whatever digital program you use, then lay out the UVs. Once those are solid we begin painting the model-- I use a combination of body paint and photoshop, this is typically the longest part of the process, but also thankfully the most fun. Then we have to do all the technical stuff like rigging, separating texture layers for different equipment slots, assigning material IDs to the model so it knows how to stitch together the armors. We then need to figure out how to cull IDs for overlapping pieces of armor, deciding the names of the items and entering them into the engine, setting up stats, drop rates, and all that jazz. After they're exported and have the animations to support them we'll spawn them in game and check them out for bugs.


    MATT LEFFERTS

    When we animate a new character we always start with the most important animation first. The Idle. 90% of the rest of the animation set is going to branch from this animation, and it's a deceptively complex animation to capture right. It's the animation that is going to be the most indicative of the character's personality right off the bat. As an animator, this is when you get inside the head of the character. How intelligent is it?? What are its cultural influences?? What's it like alone in a room with a baby?? It has to sell and suggest so much to the player, without being distracting or overbearing. The most common approach for this type of game is to make the character sway back and forth or look as though it's breathing. Once we have something we like, we move onto the attacks and movement animations (I.E. Runs and Walks), then the deaths and what we call the "Hits". "Hits" are the animations of the character reacting to being attacked. With those done, we have the most basic set we need to export a character and test it out in the game. Here at Runic, the process of exporting the animations and setting up the character in game actually stays with me in the animation department. Everything is done with our inhouse tool TorchEd, setting up the sound effects attached to a given animation, the triggers for when damage is applied, and certain particle effects. It's also in TorchEd that we create a unit file to turn the character into an actual monster. At this point we're not too worried about the specific stats of the new character but more about its general feel and behavior.


    JEFF
    Once we've received a new concept from the concept artists we'll start in on modeling the character, not worrying TOO much about poly count until we've gotten a good representation of the character in 3D. Once we're happy with model, it's time to unwrap the skin of the model onto a flat plane so that we can start painting the texture in photoshop. The average texture size for our monsters is 256x256. During the process of texturing there will usually be some model tweaks made as we see the final character coming together. Once the texture is complete, we may review the model again for any areas where we can cut down the polygon count without affecting the look of the character.

    Once we're through creating the model and texture we pass it on to the animators who create a skeleton for the model to be attached to. This skeleton is what the animators manipulate to create and record the animations used in the game. The animators along with the engineers then take creatures and set them up in the game with skills, behaviors and abilities.


    Players/Armor Sets
    While we generally use the same process as monsters, because the players can mix and match different pieces of armor (and hair/faces at character creation) the process for creating player characters is a bit more complicated/technical. Every armor set has 6 visual pieces that can be taken off (helm, shoulders, chest, pants, gloves and boots) and all of these pieces for EVERY set of armor need to fit with each other. Because of this, there are particular "seams" on the arms, legs, waist and neck of the character that all of the armor designs must fit into. Sometimes when we receive a concept the design for the new armor poses some problems because it doesn't quite fit these restrictions, so we generally have more back and forth design discussions with the concept artists about armor.

    On top of that, every armor set needs TWO models, one male and one female. Some armor sets might even include 2 slightly different designs for the chest piece between male and females as well.

    Because of all these reasons, player armor can be A LOT of work, heheh. Once the armor sets are attached to the player skeletons, they can be put into the game and testing can begin; swapping all the parts from all of the sets with each other to make sure everything is working properly.


    20. (A request) Can we get a video of artist drawing texture for some model from scratch.. doesn't have to be even moderated, just sped up video of your work.

    JASON

    For this piece, no. We just didn't have the time to put this together, but we'll try to do something similar for a future 'modders' guide.

    BUT, we didn't want to leave you guys without something new to look at. Lefferts rendered out a couple animations to highlight the changes to the Animation Selection System and we've got a concept piece showing off some Outlander and Railmen gear. Sorry, no new class announcement....yet. Yet.


    That's all! A HUGE thank you to the Art Team, especially Jason for putting this all together, as well as everyone in the community who contributed questions. To everyone else out there, reading this, Happy Holidays! The Runic dev team will be closing for the holidays in about a week from now, and in January they'll be back with some huge developments! Of course I'll be around the site doing some work on it while I have the time, so don't be afraid to come around and say hi!

    Files:
    Image: Attachment 2225
    Animation 1 Raw: http://files.runicgamesfansite.com/hum_f_idle_fist_dw.MOV
    Animation 2 Raw: http://files.runicgamesfansite.com/hum_f_idle_pistol_dw.mov
    Last edited by Webbstre; 12-09-2010 at 02:45 PM.

  2. #2
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    Re: Exclusive Art Interview!

    these are pointing to the same file

    there is no idle pistol that I can find

  3. #3
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    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_lis...7D61964A174604

    Playlist with those two animations

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    "That's write, those questions"

    lol, is it Right to Write it like that?

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    Question Re: Exclusive Art Interview!

    I fixed the file link, and the spelling error. I was VERY tired when I posted this last night :P Anything else I missed?

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    great job on getting the interview. Awesome to read some stuff on TL2.

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    lol, I actually though it was on purpose! it seemed like you were making a joke about about our "written" questions being answered.

  8. #8
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    There's an inconsistency on the page names, it goes:
    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Page 4
    Part 5

    question 7 also seems to be hiding in with the light blue text

  9. #9
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    Re: Exclusive Art Interview!

    Can't believe I missed this! Just read through it and want to say "awesome work Webb!!!" Thanks!

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